Supporting Mental Health in UI Patients

    • Urinary Incontinence (UI) affects more than 423 million people worldwide. That’s 8.7% of the world’s population. Among those diagnosed with UI, almost half over the age of 65 depend on the care of others at home or in a nursing home.

      UI is a symptom of other health conditions, many of which are physical. Although certain neurological disorders – such as dementia – can also contribute to UI, mental health is often overlooked when providing care.

      Supporting mental health in someone with UI requires identifying symptoms of psychological distress and taking steps to reduce it when possible. Lowering someone’s mental illness symptoms usually entails providing emotional support, but it also involves knowing what products – such as clothing, bedding, and incontinence pads – will help your patient live a fulfilling life.

      How Does UI Affect Mental Health?

      UI is a life-changing diagnosis that involves significant re-adaptation to one’s surroundings. These changes may result in feelings of stigma, frustration, and shame, as well as feelings of anxiety and depression.

      Not all individuals with UI are aware of how severely a new diagnosis can affect their mental state. In fact, over half of all UI patients do not seek mental healthcare, despite reporting symptoms of mental distress. As the partner or caregiver of someone with UI, look for the following mental health symptoms:

      Decreased Interest in Exercise or Sports

      Individuals with UI tend to become less physically active, primarily due to a fear of others discovering their condition. Other factors include concerns about bladder leakage and the need to find a bathroom . A sedentary lifestyle can lead to obesity and type II diabetes, especially in elderly people. Furthermore, giving up an exercise hobby or sport may contribute to psychological distress in once-active UI patients.

      Reduced Intake of Foods or Liquids

      People with UI may decrease the amount of foods they eat or liquids they drink in an attempt to make their bladder leakage less noticeable or more manageable . However, decreased fluid intake can lead to constipation and urinary tract infections.

      Decreased Interest in Social Outings

      The potential for leaks and smell leaves many UI patients and caregivers homebound. Travel is also a concern for people with UI, due to uncertainty of whether toilets will be accessible at travel destinations or on public transport. Decreased social interaction may contribute to symptoms of anxiety and depression in both parties.

      Increased Irritability and Anger

      UI patients may become irritable and angry due to a perceived inability to master their UI, or from the negative impact that UI has on their lives. Anger may be the product of lack of sleep, a lack of social interaction, or feelings of shame.

      These are four of the most common ways in which UI patients express mental distress. However, psychological upset may present itself in a variety of ways. If you observe behaviors that seem maladaptive or out of the ordinary, consult a professional.

      How Can Caregivers Support Mental Health in UI Patients?

      As a caregiver, supporting your patients’ mental health is as important as supporting their physical health. Here are some ways to support your patient’s mental well-being:

      • Support them in engaging in light to moderate physical activity for at least an hour per day. Suggest going to the park, going shopping, or even going to the gym.
      • Encourage them to get enough fluids. The recommended intake is 1.5 to 2 liters per day.
      • Tell them the importance of maintaining contact with their friends and loved ones. Assist them in organizing small social gatherings, as well as attending interest-group meetings with like-minded individuals.
      • Ask them about their levels of frustration or anger, especially following a new diagnosis. Remain available to help them in their adjustment to a life with UI.

      Other Supports for UI Patients

      Being diagnosed with UI means re-adjusting to life, but that adjustment doesn’t have to be difficult. A waterproof mattress cover, as well as easy-to-remove clothing, are inexpensive solutions for avoiding unwanted leaks and making toilet trips less urgent. The result can be less sleep interruptions, as well as reduced feelings of anxiety in social situations.

      Your choice of incontinence pad also matters. Discreet packaging, odor control, and compact design all make it easier for you and your patient to manage UI at home and in public. iD incontinence pads meets these criteria. Coming in many sizes and absorbencies, they allow any and all people with UI to discreetly manage their condition.

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